Dogs of the Mining West

Most dogs in the western frontier were considering working dogs—usually hunting, killing rodents, or guarding the prospector’s camp or cabin. Occasionally, as seen in the photo or the Alaskan Prospector below, they filled the role of pack animal.

These dogs often appear in photos of miners and mining towns. The images demonstrate one thing conclusively—that the dogs may have been hired for a job, but they were also revered members of frontier homes and towns, and reliable and cherished companions to miners and prospectors.

Miners Pose with Dog at Altman, Colorado

Dog poses at Tom Ellis' home near Altman Colorado
Dog poses at Tom Ellis’ home near Altman, Colorado early 1890s

This miner’s humble cabin near Altman, Colorado (Cripple Creek district) was situated at over 10,000 feet in elevation. It certainly must have felt warmer with this big fluffy member of the family inside. Altman is a ghost town now, but was once an active mining town in one of the West’s greatest gold districts.

Alaskan Prospector With His Dog

Prospector with his dog near Seward, Alaska 1900-1916
Colorized and enhanced image of a prospector with his dog near Seward, Alaska 1900-1916

This iconic image of a prospector and his dog was taken near Seward, Alaska sometime between 1900 and 1916. In addition to be a valuable companion in what was a lonely occupation, the dog is packing more than his share of the goods necessary for life in the wilderness.

Dog at the Reigns in Leadville, Colorado

Dog at the reigns of a horse-drawn sleigh in Leadville, Colorado 1880s
Dog at the reigns of a horse-drawn sleigh in Leadville, Colorado 1880s

At an elevation of over 10,000 feet, Leadville, Colorado was the state’s most important mining city in the 1880s. In this photo a dog takes the reigns of a horse-drawn sleigh.

Miner Poses With His Dog at Silver Plume, Colorado

Miner and His Dog near Silver Plume, Colorado
Miner and his dog near Silver Plume, Colorado ca. 1900

This photo of a miner with his dog was taken near Silver Plume, Colorado around 1900. The photo is further proof that although dogs were largely kept as working animals, they were still cherished by their owners.

Tough Crew of Colorado Miners and Their Dog

Miners pose with dog at their cabin somewhere in Colorado
Miners pose with dog at their cabin somewhere in Colorado

This late 1800s era photograph from Colorado shows a tough looking bunch of miners at their cabin. Even the toughest pioneers enjoyed having a dog around.

Dog Poses with Boarding House Staff – Silver City, Utah

Dog poses with proprietors of a Boarding House in Silver City, Utah ca. 1880s
Dog poses with staff of a boarding house in Silver City, Utah ca. 1880s

A photo of this boarding house in Silver City, Utah wouldn’t be complete without the resident dog posing with the staff. Note how many large breed dogs there were in the West – these were often used for hunting.

Dog Takes Center Stage at Nevadaville, Colorado

Dog photobombs a scene from Nevadaville, Colorado 1883
Dog photobombs a scene from Nevadaville, Colorado 1883

Photobombs may be a regular feature of the internet today, but dogs invented the art over 100 years ago. This dog gets into a photo of the citzens of Nevadaville, Colorado, but nobody seems to mind. Note the small dog being held by a man at the right of the photo.

Family and Dog Inspect Home Wreckage at Mace, Idaho

Dog inspects the Weekler family's home that demolished by a snowslide - Mace, Idaho 1910
Dog inspects the Weekler family’s home that demolished by a snowslide – Mace, Idaho 1910

The silver mining town of Mace, Idaho was prone to snowslides and was almost completely destroyed by one in 1910. This photo captures a family inspecting what is left of their home after the 1910 slide destroyed it. Even in times of tragedy the family dog was present and ready to help.

Dogs Pose With Their People at Sneffels, Colorado

Dog with his family in a horse drawn-sleigh at Sneffels, Colorado 1896
Dog with his family in a horse drawn-sleigh at Sneffels, Colorado 1896. Note the dog standing with the crowd as well

At over 10,600 feet, Sneffels, Colorado was one of Colorado’s highest elevation mining towns. In this photo a family with a baby is traveling in a horse-drawn sleigh and the family spaniel rides with them. Another dog poses with the crowd behind the sleigh.

Thunder Mountain, Idaho Pioneers Pose With Dog

Early residents of Thunder Mountain, Idaho pose with dog 1904
Early residents of Thunder Mountain, Idaho pose with dog 1904

The 1902 rush to Thunder Mountain, Idaho occurred just as winter was setting in and resulted in a disastrous situation where the remote camp was completely out of food and hundreds faced starvation.

By 1904 when this photo was taken, the camp had recovered and the business of mining had replaced the basic struggle for survival. Photos of Thunder Mountain often depict dogs as an important part of camp life.

Dog is Part of the Mine Crew at Kennett, California

Waiting for Supper at the Mammoth Mine - Kennett, California ca. 1910.
Can you find the dog in this photo? Waiting for supper at the Mammoth Mine – Kennett, California ca. 1910

Kennett, California was a copper mining town in Northern California. Copper camps were ususally large industrial affairs rather than loose collections of log cabins that typified prospectors camps in the West. Despite that, dogs still had a place in the community.

The photo above shows hundreds of men assembled for supper at the mess hall and one honorary dog being posed for the scene.

Giant Bull Gear at a Virginia City, Nevada Foundry

Bull gear leaving the foundry at Virginia City, Nevada ca. 1880s
Bull gear leaving the foundry at Virginia City, Nevada ca. 1880s. Dog supervises

The silver mines at Virginia City, Nevada experienced what was referred to as the “Great Bonanza” in the late 1870s. The silver ore was incredibly rich, but also very deep in the ground. Extremes of heat and high water tables also complicated mining efforts.

The difficulties of the Virginia City mines spurred the development of new technologies and mining equipment at scales never previously seen. In the photo above a massive bull gear is leaving the foundry, and trusted spaniel oversees the delivery.

Dog Poses at Frontier Pawn Shop

Pawn Brokers - Ironton Colorado 1886
B.Ware and I.Steele Pawn Brokers pose with their dog in Ironton, Colorado 1886

This comically named pawn shop in Ironton, Colorado demonstrates that the pioneers did indeed have a sense of humor, even if they never smiled for photos. Even B. Ware and I. Steele Pawn Brokers had a resident canine.

Pals Asleep at Rawhide, Nevada

Man and dog asleep at Rawhide, Nevada 1908
Man and dog asleep at Rawhide, Nevada 1908

The 1906 rush to Rawhide, Nevada was one of that decade’s most important events in Nevada. Thousands converged on the town after rich gold and silver discoveries were made.

Ultimately the mines at Rawhide were not rich enough to justify the size of the rush to the town, but at least some disillusioned miners still had their canine pals to console them.

The railroad depot at Corona, Colorado ca. 1905
Dog waits for passengers at the railroad depot at Corona, Colorado ca. 1905

At 11,600 feet, Corona, Colorado existed for one reason – to keep trains running over the the highest altitude standard gauge rail station in North America. Almost the entire “town” was built in giant snowsheds, as illustrated by the photo above.

This was known as one of the most inhospitable locations in the west, where railroad workers “didn’t want to be”. Despite all that, the station had a little spaniel as seen in the photo – perhaps to hunt rodents, maybe to greet passengers, or likely both.

Spaniel Poses With Miners at Nevada Mine Entrance

Dog poses at mine entrance somewhere in Nevada - late 1800s
Dog poses at mine entrance somewhere in Nevada – late 1800s (colorized)

Spaniels are one of the more common breeds seen in mining camp photos from the late 1800s. They were primarily hunting dogs although so many of them are seen posing in these photos that “mining camp ambassador” was likely their secondary job.

This colorized photo of miners posing at a mine entrance is available as a high-resolution digital download to subscribers. See more colorized photos of miners here.

The Elkhorn Palace at Rosita, Colorado

Colorado miner at his cabin with his dog ca. 1880
This Colorado miner is living large at his “Elkhorn Palace”

A man at his palace, relaxing with a book and his best friend. Certainly many people these days would exchange their current lives for a few days at the storied Elkhorn Palace. Location: Rosita, Colorado

Dog Poses with Denver & Rio Grande Locomotive

DR&G locomotive at Salida, Colroado
DR&G locomotive at Salida, Colroado ca. 1900

Even rail workers can be found posing with their four-legged friends. Salida, Colorado was one of the West’s most important railroad hubs and an important smelting center for the mines of Chaffee County.